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Call for papers Conferences

ICT4DA 2017 is waiting for workshop participants

ICT4DA 2017 – International Conference on ICT for Development for Africa will take place in Bahir Dar, Ethiopia on 25-27 September 2017.

The Conference will bring together technology experts, researchers, industry and international authorities contributing towards the development of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in the fields of socioeconomic development, international development, and human rights.

Topics of interest to the conference are divided into 5 main areas:

  1. E-Services
  2. Natural Language Processing
  3. Intelligent Systems
  4. Mobile and Wireless Communication
  5. Privacy and Security

Click HERE to see more.

All accepted papers will be published by Springer and made available through SpringerLink Digital Library, one of the world’s largest scientific libraries. Proceedings are submitted for inclusion to the leading indexing services: Elsevier (EI), Thomson Scientific (ISI), Scopus, Crossref, Google Scholar, DBLP. Authors of the Best Papers will be invited to submit an extended version of their work through one of the EAI Endorsed Publications.

Do not miss a chance to submit your paper to the ICT4DA workshops!

  • Workshop #1: ICT-Supported Innovation for building the African Knowledge Economy
  • Workshop #2: Affordable Broadband in Under-Served Regions Based on Innovative Communications Paradigms and Dynamic Spectrum Access Networks

Important dates:

Notification and Registration opens: 17 July 2017
Camera-ready Deadline: 7 August 2017
Workshop 1 Deadline: 15 July
Workshop 2 Deadline: 15 July

For further information about ICT4DA 2017, visit the official website of the conference.

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Call for papers Conferences

Deadline extension: ICT4DA 2017

ICT4DA 2017 – International Conference on ICT for Development for Africa will take place in Bahir Dar, Ethiopia on 30-31 January, 2017.

The Conference will bring together technology experts, researchers, industry and international authorities contributing towards the development of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in the fields of socioeconomic development, international development, and human rights.

The Conference welcomes research papers in the following topics of interest:

E-Services

  • e-Health/ m-Helath
  • e-Agriculture/m-Agriculture
  • E-learning/m-Learning
  • E-Government/m-Government
  • E-Business/m-Business

Natural Language Processing

  • Speech Recognition
  • Speech Synthesis
  • Dialogue systems
  • Text processing
  • Phonology
  • Morphology
  • Syntax
  • Semantics
  • Discourse
  • POS Tagging
  • Parsing
  • Word Sense Disambiguation
  • Machine translation
  • Speech/Text  Corpora
  • Information Extraction
  • Automatic Text Summarization
  • Question Answering

Intelligent Systems

  • Artificial intelligence
  • Decision support systems
  • Prediction systems in different application areas
  • Autonomous multi-agent systems
  • Computer vision
  • Image processing
  • Robotics
  • Character recognition
  • Knowledge Base Systems
  • Data Mining
  • Machine Learning
  • Information Reterival
  • Recommended systems
  • Fuzzy logic

Mobile and Wireless Communication

  • Wireless communication
  • Wireless Sensor networks
  • Wireless cognitive networks
  • Cellular networks (LTE, LTE-Advanced, 5G)
  • Wireless local area network (802.11, WiMAX, etc)
  • Internet of every things
  • Ad hoc Networks
  • Energy Aware Mobile Computing
  • Mobile Cloud Computing
  • Semantic Web Technologies
  • Vehicular Ad hoc Networks
  • Energy efficient networking, communication and protocols
  • Energy efficiency in networking, wireless networks and vehicular networks
  • Energy efficiency in data centers and large-scale data processing
  • Intelligent Transport Systems and control
  • Wearable Computing
  • Body Area Networks
  • Social Network Applications to Mobile Computing
  • Context and Location Aware Applications and Services
  • Mobile Data Management and Analytics
  • Mobile Multimedia
  • Mobile User Interfaces and Interaction Technologies
  • Mobile User Experience

Privacy and Security

  • Identity and Trust Management
  • Crypto-analysis and Cryptography
  • Network and Wireless Security
  • Operating Systems Security
  • Biometrics
  • Smart cards
  • RFID
  • Access control
  • Intrusion detection

ICT4DA 2017 is proud to host  Prof. Lou Boves (Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen), who  has originated and coordinated a large number of national and European projects on automatic speech synthesis, automatic speech recognition, speaker verification, language modelling and speech-language resources, as a keynote speaker. 

All accepted papers will be published by Springer and made available through SpringerLink Digital Library, one of the world’s largest scientific libraries. Proceedings are submitted for inclusion to the leading indexing services: Elsevier (EI), Thomson Scientific (ISI), Scopus, Crossref, Google Scholar, DBLP. Authors of the Best Papers will be invited to submit an extended version of their work through one of the EAI Endorsed Publications.

Important dates:

Full Paper Submission deadline:  15th October 2016  21st October, 2016

Notification and Registration opens:  15th November 2016   21st November, 2016

Camera-ready deadline:  10th December 2016  16th December, 2016

For further information about ICT4DA 2017, visit the official website.

Categories
Call for papers Conferences

ICT4DA 2017 is calling for papers!

ICT4DA 2017 – International Conference on ICT for Development for Africa will take place in Bahir Dar, Ethiopia on 30-31 January, 2017.

The Conference will bring together technology experts, researchers, industry and international authorities contributing towards the development of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in the fields of socioeconomic development, international development, and human rights.

The Conference welcomes research papers in the following topics of interest:

E-Services

  • e-Health/ m-Helath
  • e-Agriculture/m-Agriculture
  • E-learning/m-Learning
  • E-Government/m-Government
  • E-Business/m-Business

Natural Language Processing

  • Speech Recognition
  • Speech Synthesis
  • Dialogue systems
  • Text processing
  • Phonology
  • Morphology
  • Syntax
  • Semantics
  • Discourse
  • POS Tagging
  • Parsing
  • Word Sense Disambiguation
  • Machine translation
  • Speech/Text  Corpora
  • Information Extraction
  • Automatic Text Summarization
  • Question Answering

Intelligent Systems

  • Artificial intelligence
  • Decision support systems
  • Prediction systems in different application areas
  • Autonomous multi-agent systems
  • Computer vision
  • Image processing
  • Robotics
  • Character recognition
  • Knowledge Base Systems
  • Data Mining
  • Machine Learning
  • Information Reterival
  • Recommended systems
  • Fuzzy logic

Mobile and Wireless Communication

  • Wireless communication
  • Wireless Sensor networks
  • Wireless cognitive networks
  • Cellular networks (LTE, LTE-Advanced, 5G)
  • Wireless local area network (802.11, WiMAX, etc)
  • Internet of every things
  • Ad hoc Networks
  • Energy Aware Mobile Computing
  • Mobile Cloud Computing
  • Semantic Web Technologies
  • Vehicular Ad hoc Networks
  • Energy efficient networking, communication and protocols
  • Energy efficiency in networking, wireless networks and vehicular networks
  • Energy efficiency in data centers and large-scale data processing
  • Intelligent Transport Systems and control
  • Wearable Computing
  • Body Area Networks
  • Social Network Applications to Mobile Computing
  • Context and Location Aware Applications and Services
  • Mobile Data Management and Analytics
  • Mobile Multimedia
  • Mobile User Interfaces and Interaction Technologies
  • Mobile User Experience

Privacy and Security

  • Identity and Trust Management
  • Crypto-analysis and Cryptography
  • Network and Wireless Security
  • Operating Systems Security
  • Biometrics
  • Smart cards
  • RFID
  • Access control
  • Intrusion detection

All accepted papers will be published by Springer and made available through SpringerLink Digital Library, one of the world’s largest scientific libraries. Proceedings are submitted for inclusion to the leading indexing services: Elsevier (EI), Thomson Scientific (ISI), Scopus, Crossref, Google Scholar, DBLP. Authors of the Best Papers will be invited to submit an extended version of their work through one of the EAI Endorsed Publications.

Important dates:

Workshops proposal deadline:  30 July 2016

Full Paper Submission deadline:  15 September 2016

Exhibits and Demos:  15 September 2016

Notification and Registration opens:  1 November 2016

Camera-ready deadline:  30 November 2016

For further information about ICT4DA 2017, visit the official website.

Categories
News

Battle over Tor's integrity is led at the university level after FBI involvement

When it comes to internet security, the struggle between organizations employing counter-measures against one another will never end, as long as there are exploits to patch. In news that surprised absolutely nobody, researchers have developed a “hardened” version of the Tor Browser, which allows users to easily browse internet in complete anonymity, Motherboard reports. While undoubtedly ingenious, it is not the solution that is so newsworthy, but the stakeholders involved and the ideologies that flow underneath.

We have written about the Tor network before and the facts remain the same. Tor is used to perform illegal trade, and some of the people who use it are sought-after terrorists, which is why the Federal Bureau of Investigation is interested. It is also used as a means of communication in countries where freedom of speech is not a given, and where online activity is under heavy surveillance. Journalists use it to get sensitive information, and researchers use it to explore the darker parts of our society. Civil rights activists and whistleblowers alike employ it regularly. It is a grey area in ever sense of the word.

It now seems that competition over this controversial part of the web is led at the level of university-based organizations, following the reports that Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) was subpoenaed by the FBI to provide intelligence regarding vulnerabilities in Tor’s security in 2014. That particular case involved charges of online drug trade and possession of child pornography and even though it resulted in the “identification of at least another seventeen black markets on TOR”, emotions ran high, as told to Motherboard by the co-founder of the Tor Project, Nick Mathewson:

“If you’re doing an experiment without the knowledge or consent of the people you’re experimenting on, you might be doing something questionable—and if you’re doing it without their informed consent because you know they wouldn’t give it to you, then you’re almost certainly doing something wrong. Whatever you’re doing, it isn’t science.”

Tor Project went as far as accusing CMU of receiving $1 million from the FBI for performing sweeping attacks on its users. They also expressed doubt over the validity of the attack warrant, given that it was not narrowly tailored to specific criminal activity.

Whatever the case, FBI is still using the method devised by CMU to deanonymize Tor users in 2016, which is why Open Technology Fund commissioned a study on current and future hardening efforts to reduce the attack surface of the Tor Browser. The recently published paper that is trying to address this specific incident was authored by researchers not only from the Tor Project, but also Italian and German universities. The question is as open as ever – what role should university-based research bodies play in state surveillance?

If some are making an effort to reinforce the Tor network, while others are finding ways of exploiting it (subpoenaed or not), the purpose of the academia in global online privacy is either undefined, or it is being violated actively.

Categories
News

Stanford researchers reveal surprisingly sensitive information from phone metadata

Original press release was issued by Stanford University.

The collection of phone metadata (numbers dialed and length of calls), as controversial as it is on general principle, has never really been a subject of significant public backlash as a serious breach of privacy. As a society, we just don’t suppose that what government agencies can learn from our metadata is in some way sensitive private information. Which is why this information can be accessed without a warrant.

This might soon change in the light of research performed by a team at Stanford University, who have managed to easily infer suprisingly sensitive and accurate personal information – such as health details – from metadata alone. Additionally, the reach of such surveillence has been demonstrated to be larger than previously thought – following metadata “hops” from one person’s communications can involve thousands of people. The findings provide the first empirical data on the privacy properties of telephone metadata.

The researchers set out to fill knowledge gaps within the National Security Agency’s current phone metadata program, which has drawn conflicting assertions about its privacy impacts. The law currently treats call content and metadata separately and makes it easier for government agencies to obtain metadata, in part because it assumes that it shouldn’t be possible to infer specific sensitive details about people based on metadata alone.

“I was somewhat surprised by how successfully we inferred sensitive details about individuals,” said study co-author Patrick Mutchler, a graduate student at Stanford. “It feels intuitive that the businesses you call say something about yourself. But when you look at how effectively we were able to identify that a person likely had a medical condition, which we consider intensely private, that was interesting.”

From a small selection of the users, the Stanford researchers were able to infer, for instance, that a person who placed several calls to a cardiologist, a local drugstore and a cardiac arrhythmia monitoring device hotline likely suffers from cardiac arrhythmia. Another study participant likely owns an AR semiautomatic rifle, based on frequent calls to a local firearms dealer that prominently advertises AR semiautomatic rifles and to the customer support hotline of a major firearm manufacturer that produces these rifles.

The computer scientists built an app that retrieved the previous call and text message metadata from more than 800 volunteers’ smartphone logs. In total, participants provided records of more than 250,000 calls and 1.2 million texts. The researchers then used a combination of inexpensive automated and manual processes to illustrate both the extent of the reach – how many people would be involved in a scan of a single person – and the level of sensitive information that can be gleaned about each user.

By extrapolating participant data, the researchers estimated that the NSA’s current authorities could allow for surveilling roughly 25,000 individuals – and possibly more – starting from just one “seed” phone user.

Although the results are not surprising, the researchers said that the raw, empirical data provide a better-informed starting point for future conversations between privacy interest groups and policymakers.

“If we’re going to pick a sweet spot as society, where we want the privacy vs. security tradeoff to lie, it’s important to understand the implications of the polices that we have,” Mutchler said. “In this paper, we have empirical data, which I think will help people make informed decisions.”