Categories
News

Issue 12 of EAI Endorsed Transactions on e-Learning is out!

The EAI Endorsed Transactions on e-Learning provide a common forum to publish high quality papers, and to offer readers a single source to get inspiring ideas and important findings in this area. It is our honor to present the 12th issue of dedicated transactions on e-Learning.
Education is one domain that has accompanied civilization throughout the centuries, adapting its tools to fulfill the expectations of students and the needs of teachers. Such tools can be as obvious and traditional as pencils and notebooks, or as complex and innovative as websites or multi-user virtual environments.
The 12th issue of the journal is now available for free via EUDL with topics ranging from Learning through Virtual Worlds, Blended Learning, Performance Assessment, Student Profiling, and much more.
If your research meets the topics of the journal, do not hesitate to submit it.

Categories
Interviews

'We have not really taken control of technology in e-Learning. We have allowed it to happen to us.'

We had the pleasure of talking with Kevin O’Rourke, head of e-Learning Support & Development in Dublin Institute of Technology, who currently works with the National Forum for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning in Irish higher education. We were happy to welcome Kevin as a keynote speaker at eLEOT 2016, 3rd EAI International Conference on e-Learning e-Education and Online Training, and pick his brains on how ICT technologies are tackling problems in teaching in learning, both new and old.
Could you summarize the scope of your current work and what you came to share with everyone at this event?
Essentially, my current work is looking at the infrastructure that is used across Ireland’s 25 publicly funded higer education institutions from a digital perspective. In 2014, the National Forum produced the roadmap for digital development across the sector, and as a part of that, it became clear that we really have very little idea as to what people have been using sectorally. They have been using all kinds of different virtual learning environments, they use different tools from Google, Microsoft, lots of free tools, so part the work of me and my co-workers is to actually put some shape on that, so that we can have a picture, nationally, of what is in use across the sector. And it’s been quite interesting.
The one that’s become clear to me and certainly one thing that is part of my presentation at the conference is that I believe that, for the most part, we have not really taken control of technology. As a sector, we have very much allowed technology to happen to us, and while we have specific tools such as Moodle and Blackboard across the sector, we haven’t deployed them in any strategic way for education purposes. And I think a part of that has to do with the fact that, certainly, nobody is gonna tell anybody how to do their teaching, but another part is that, for the most part, we just don’t know what it is we want or how we want to deploy them. We put the tools in place which has let people to do as they please, but what I have been discovering, particularly in the Irish sector, is that it seems to be a fairly universal phenomenon and I think the future is going to involve us being a little more savvy in our use of digital tools. They have changed the way the world is and the way we look at the world and I think our students and our educators and staff need to be educated into the uses of these tools, what they can do for learning, the way they are fundamentally changing the way a university regards itself, the way business is done, the way trading is done, and I think we need to, rather than to simply add tools and allow things happen to us, we need to be much more strategic as we go into the future around our use of technologies.
Some argue that digital age has introduced neurological changes to our brains, suggesting that young people today have a harder time to, for example, perform deep reading. Some say that hypertext has programmed us to take in a great breadth of information, but at a shallow level. Do you think that the way our brains keep jumping to different ideas and activities in short bursts can be leveraged to achieve more efficient learning methods? Or do you think that this trend is mostly negative and something about how young people access information needs to change at a fundamental level?
The change certainly is problematic for higher education in so far as our model is very much based on that old hour long lecture followed by a recall of facts that are examined in an assessment practice. That model has certainly worked for a long time, but obviously, there is something a little bit “wrong” with it. Because of the way we can now communicate it is not necessary to continue to perform education in that classroom-based manner and everybody acknowledges that. We also know that classrooms have never been the best way for people to learn. Quite often, it is by getting people to teach and participate that they get to learn a little better than simply by receiving information and regurgitating, for lack of a better word.
Obviously, young people are learning things today that perhaps aren’t quite the things that we want them to. Take for instance gaming – yes there is definitely learning happening there, but it’s not curriculum-aligned, even though it could be if we were to spend some time with it. But on the other hand too, the notion of deep reading and deeper understanding is the mark of scholarship. The notion of writing as well – writing is the currency of scholarship. What many people would say today is that students today aren’t writing the way they should and there is no reason why we shouldn’t actually have them writing and producing their ideas, even in other formats such as video, while having them work together in ways that wasn’t possible before. In the past, the notion that students plagiarize and the notion that they are not willing to engage with ideas is I think more of a problem of the way we assess students than the students themselves. After all, it’s quite clever in many ways if they can plagiarize and get away with it (laughs). You know, shame on us for not designing assessments that do not authentically assess them.
What I think is becoming increasingly important is the notion of coaxing our students into learning, the notion that when we design a course, the learning almost has to be hidden. I don’t want to say that we have to ‘trick’ students into learning but I’ve heard the phrase ‘head fake’ being used when students realize that they have learned something after they have come to an experience – whatever that is and howeever that is.
So I think that it’s about a combination of, indeed, some classroom-based education, because we are social creatures when it comes to learning, but also utilizing technology in ways that we haven’t thought about before. We can design our syllabi and curriculums in ways that exploit the potentials of the technology and that will take us beyond ourselves and challenge us a little more, as well as students.
At the conference, I looked at the notion of the class, and the belonging to a class, and the lecture as a center of learning, and we can certainly retain that to some extent, but we certainly need to rethink how we do that and how we are dealing with the people we are dealing with. We need to be aware of the the notion that in a classroom a student can correct us by accessing information that is available through internet. We need to find ways to engage our students that perhaps might challenge them to find the data, to actually share data among themselves and to not simply listen to us, as the parlance goes, the “sage on the stage”. There is a wealth of information out there and we really need to think about how we teach, how we engage our students in ways that are relevant to the current situation because technology is here, it’s not going away and access to that information is there at all times.
Do you think that people who have better access to e-learning and online training enjoy the actual learning process more than those who don’t?
In the case of enjoying the experience, we have to be honest with ourselves and say that there is an awful lot of badly designed online courses out there. There is a lot of courses where the notion has been that you sit there, you read a page, you read a second page, then you do a quick test to see if you recall the first two pages okay, you do the next two pages, so it’s just “click-click-click-test, click-click-click-test” – and that is not particularly engaging for students.
Yes, for those who need to achieve a qualification online for the work CPD – they will go through it, they will endure it. But what it comes down to is not necessarily having to get through that type of learning experience because it seems that people won’t engage. Courses need to be designed to engage the students, to keep them aboard in ways that involve not just interaction with the content, but also interaction with each other. And I think the whole Moog experience, to some extent, has shown that people need to be motivated, they need reasons for engaging with it. Level of learning is one of the reasons, but it may not be the top reason why people engage. When, for instance, people need CPD for their work and so on, they may not enjoy the experience but they will complete it because their carreer depends upon it.
Learning itself, I’m not sure that people enjoy the whole time coming into lectures. Quite often, the traditional classroom experience is not necessarily an enjoyable experience in the sense of learning. “Lecture delivery”, for lack of a better word, can be quite boring, “lecture delivery”, the way a lecturer performs in the classroom may not be the most engaging of things to happen. The way someone reads a series of powerpoint slides, as is sometimes the case in lectures nowadays, is not necessarily engaging.
So what it comes to – do they enjoy it more? I’m not entirely sure, in some cases, when it’s designed well, they certainly can. What I know from my own experiences – both from the perspective of a lecturer and the perspective of a student – is that when you have a good online experience, it can be hugely engaging, almost all-consuming to the extent that once the class is over, you almost miss it and the engagement that you had with students. And I’ve heard the same from students as well. When there has been a good online experience where people have enjoyed learning, but it can be the same in a classroom. Again, it is around the design, it’s around the individual who has conducted the session.
Do students who use e-learning methods achieve the same results as full-time students visiting lectures at school in person?
A lot of studies are showing that there is no significant difference, that those who are online can achieve the same results, sometimes better results than students in traditional classrooms.
But how do we measure that? That’s another point. Traditionally, one of the things that I’d say from my own experience as a teacher is that I will certainly use the data from the back end of our system to see if students have engaged with class. I will try to design the class so that they have to engage with each other online, but even that they engage with the material. That is a part of my feedback to students at the end of the course – I will say “this course is designed with a 5-credit module, it’s designed to do a hundred hours and I can see from the back end, from the analytics side, that you have engaged with that side for only six hours”, for instance. In terms of course attendance, you need to have in the reason of a hundred hours the question – “where is the rest of it and are you sure you’ve engaged adequately with it?” So there are ways of assessing students and the results that can be achieved that are more than purely a mark on paper.
So I guess ‘how we assess students’ is hugely important and we can assess them differently in this digital era. We must start thinking more and more about assessment. In fact, one of the themes of the National Forum in the current year is assessment, the possibilities of digital assessment and what it means for the ways we do it into the future.
To conclude, have you had an experience at this event that you found compelling, or which inspired you for future work?
One thing that I discovered at the conference is that small is beautiful. Before I came I was unsure as to how many people were going to be there, I have come prepared to speak to ten or a hundred, I was unclear about that. But actually, as it turns out, what was good was that there were 30-40 people – and the great thing about that was that in the course of the two days I got to speak to most people, most people also spoke so we got to talk about each other’s work, we got to continue a conversation in a way that is probably not feasible at larger conferences.
I know that one thing we’ve discovered here at Dublin Institute of Technology while running an e-Learning Summer School for academic staff to engage with topics around e-Learning and learning technologies in the classroom, is that we have deliberately always kept the numbers of that under 50 because people said that in the course of the week, they get to talk to everybody and they get an experience that is quite unique in many ways. And I’d say that with being at the UCD this year, the fact that it was small really opened my eyes to the possibilities of learning in a conference as opposed to simply participating in some kind of presentational form, but to actually go and learn from others, to actually engage with people. So really, small is beautiful and well done on keeping that format in a way that was organized, yet informal enough to keep us all stimulated. I enjoyed it and hopefully I’ll get to join you again at some stage in the future.
***
eLEOT 2016 took place in Dublin between August 31 – September 2.

Categories
News

Issue 11 of EAI Endorsed Transactions on e-Learning is out!

The EAI Endorsed Transactions on e-Learning provide a common forum to publish high quality papers, and to offer readers a single source to get inspiring ideas and important findings in this area. It is our honor to present the tenth issue of dedicated transactions on e-Learning.

Education is one domain that has accompanied civilization throughout the centuries, adapting its tools to fulfill the expectations of students and the needs of teachers. Such tools can be as obvious and traditional as pencils and notebooks, or as complex and innovative as websites or multi-user virtual environments.

The eleventh issue of the journal is now available for free via EUDL with topics ranging from Augmented reality, Learning Management Systems, Avatars, and much more.

If your research meets the topics of the journal, do not hesitate to submit it.

Categories
Call for participation Conferences

Call for participation: eLEOT 2016!

Participate in eLEOT 2016! The 3rd EAI International Conference on e-Learning e-Education and Online Training will to take place in Dublin, Ireland on 31 August – 2 September, 2016.

eLEOT 2016 will focus on a significant renovation the world of education undergo these days, as the world of technology offers a rapidly increasing number of outlets for creativity and communications. Each day more classrooms can be accessed from anywhere, at any time. This year´s edition is aimed at exploring e-learning solutions that spark the attention as well as imagination of students through interactivity, immersion, variety of content, or cutting-edge technologies.

Topics of interest to eLEOT 2016 are the following:

  • Accessibility and usability of web-based instruction
  • Assessment
  • Augmented reality solutions
  • Best Practices
  • Big Data in e-learning
  • Blended learning
  • Collaborative learning and social networks
  • High-impact practices in e-learning
  • Informal e-Learning solutions
  • Learning analytics
  • Massive Open Online Course
  • Mobile learning
  • Security and privacy in education and e-learning systems
  • Social and organizational perspectives
  • Student engagement
  • Teaching/Educational Models, Frameworks and Platforms
  • Virtual Learning Environments

eLEOT 2016 is proud to welcome keynote speakers: Kevin C. O’Rourke PhD (National Forum for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning, Ireland), with the keynote speech on: “Engaging the students: change and confidence in the digital era“ and Eng. Stefano Santo Sabato (CTO for MediaSoft, Italy), introducing the topic “Augmented Learning: how to improve training in the IoT era.“

The eLEOT2016 preliminary program has been published!
The Conference will also host a workshop on “Enhancing Classroom Teaching and Learning Through Games and Virtual Reality Technology” given by Prof. Sujan Shrestha (University of Baltimore, MD, USA). Click HERE for more information about the workshop.

Accepted papers will be published in the eLEOT Conference Proceedings and by Springer-Verlag in the Lecture Notes of ICST (LNICST). The proceedings will be available both in book form and via the SpringerLink digital library, which is one of the largest digital libraries online and covers a variety of scientific disciplines.

The proceedings are submitted for inclusion to the leading indexing services: DBLP, Google Scholar, Thomson Scientific ISI Proceedings, EI Elsevier Engineering Index, CrossRef, Scopus, as well as ICST’s own EU Digital Library (EUDL).

The authors of the best papers will be invited to submit an extended version of their work through one of the following  EAI Endorsed Transactions on e-Learning, Future Intelligent Educational Environments  and Serious Games.

Important dates:

Full Paper Submission deadline: 23 May 2016

Notification and Registration opens: 14 June 2016

Camera-ready deadline: 1 July 2016  13th July 2016

Register for eLEOT 2016 HERE!

For further information about the eLEOT 2016, visit the official website of the conference.

Categories
Call for papers Conferences

eLEOT 2016: Submission Deadline Extension

The 3rd EAI International Conference on e-Learning e-Education and Online Training (eLEOT 2016) is going to take place in Dublin, Ireland on August 31 – September 2, 2016.

This year’s edition of eLEOT aims at exploring e-learning solutions that spark the attention as well as imagination of students through interactivity, immersion, variety of content, or cutting-edge technologies, as the world of technology offers a rapidly increasing number of outlets for creativity and communications, and the world of education is undergoing a significant renovation. Each day more classrooms can be accessed from anywhere, at any time.

The Conference will host the keynote speech given by Kevin C. O’Rourke (Dublin Institute of Technology) entitled ‘Engaging the students: change and confidence in the digital era‘.

eLEOT 2016 welcomes researches focused on the following topics of interest:
• Accessibility and usability of web-based instruction;
• Assessment;
• Augmented reality solutions;
• Best Practices;
• Big Data in e-learning;
• Blended learning;
• Collaborative learning and social networks;
• High-impact practices in e-learning;
• Informal e-learning solutions;
• Learning analytics;
• Massive Open Online Course;
• Mobile learning;
• Security and privacy in education and e-learning systems;
• Social and organizational perspectives;
• Student engagement;
• Teaching/Educational Models, Frameworks and Platforms;
• Virtual Learning Environments.
eLEOT 2016 welcomes submissions from presenters who will not be able to attend the conference in person: online tracks. To be able to participate through this track, the researcher will be required to meet the date, topic and publication requirements for the main conference. Upon acceptance of submission, the researcher will be required to submit a video presentation as well as a PowerPoint presentation to distribute to all who are present.

The Conference invites also papers for a special student (Masters or PhD) track that will provide a venue for students to present their work and receive feedback from senior members of the research community.

Furthermore, eLEOT 2016 will feature a Demo Session dedicated to showcasing the work featured in the presentations. Any author whose work will be accepted for presentation at the Conference will be able to set up a demonstration of the work.

Accepted papers will be published in the eLEOT Conference Proceedings and by Springer-Verlag in the Lecture Notes of ICST (LNICST). Proceedings are submitted for inclusion to the leading indexing services: DBLP, Google Scholar, Thomson Scientific ISI Proceedings, EI Elsevier Engineering Index, CrossRef, Scopus, as well as ICST’s own EU Digital Library (EUDL). Authors of the Best Papers will be invited to submit an extended version of their work through one of the following EAI Endorsed Publications: Transactions on e-Learning, Transactions on Future Intelligent Educational EnvironmentsTransactions on Serious Games.

Important dates:
Paper submission Deadline: 25th April, 2016    23rd May, 2016
Acceptance Notification Deadline: 2nd May, 2016   9th June, 2016
Camera-ready deadline: 23rd May, 2016   20th June, 2016
Check the conference official website, to get more info about eLEOT 2016.

Categories
News

New issue of EAI Endorsed Transactions on e-Learning is now out!

The EAI Endorsed Transactions on e-Learning provide a common forum to publish high quality papers, and to offer readers a single source to get inspiring ideas and important findings in this area. It is our honor to present the tenth issue of dedicated transactions on e-Learning.

Education is one domain that has accompanied civilization throughout the centuries, adapting its tools to fulfill the expectations of students and the needs of teachers. Such tools can be as obvious and traditional as pencils and notebooks, or as complex and innovative as websites or multi-user virtual environments.

The tenth issue of the journal is now available for free via EUDL with topics ranging from Learning analytics, Massive Open Online Course, Mobile learning, and much more.

If your research meets the topics of the journal, do not hesitate to submit it.

Categories
Interviews

e-Learning as a gateway to rapid innovation

Applied information technology is slowly revolutionizing different branches of industry, and aspects of our daily life. Education is a field where applied IT has already made a significant mark. We are interested in what else it can offer. We have asked Dr. Giovanni Vincenti on his view of the progress. He is the Assistant Professor at the Division of Science, Information Arts and Technologies at the University of Baltimore, and the general chair of the 3rd EAI International Conference on e-Learning e-Education and Online Training, eLEOT 2016, which took place on August 31- September 2, 2016, in Dublin, Ireland.

More developed education system should help us achieve more innovations at a faster rate. What is the role of e-Learning and e-Education in this?

There are really only two purposes that e-learning serves. First of all, it is about the delivery of the content. Before e-learning and educational technologies started gaining a significant footprint in society, formal education would be often limited to a school or a desk. Nowadays, with the ability of downloading books to our tablets or cell phones, looking up information from reliable sources whenever we need it no matter where we are, or following lectures of world-famous experts, the concept of education has become much more pervasive and universal. As long as there is an Internet connection, often people have access to amazing resources.

The second key role of e-learning and educational technologies deals with the presentation of the material. Until around 10 or 15 years ago studying meant reading books and using our imagination to make images come alive. Perhaps the most significant example is the book “Gray’s Anatomy” by Henry Gray. This masterpiece has been the essential resource used by medical students for decades. Why not augment this classic with computer-based simulations? Why not add some online quizzes to evaluate the progress of students? And why not create an application for mobile devices that allows students to explore virtually the intricacies of the human body as they are waiting for the bus? Some of the latest developments in e-learning, especially augmented reality, have advanced the domain of education significantly.

What technologies and practices are now used in this field? What do e-Learning and e-Education work with?

GiovanniVincenti
Giovanni Vincenti, General Chair of eLEOT 2016

The field is not very well regulated (or understood), so there is a significant difference in the implementation of e-learning solutions from institution to institution. When it comes to formal education, many universities and private institutions have adopted Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC). In terms of informal education, virtual and augmented reality are in a position to create great impact on immersion.

I think there is still a general misunderstanding regarding the importance of qualified personnel. Universities in particular often have very small departments dedicated to helping instructors teach effectively. This problem is even more significant when we look at how many instructional technologists are on staff. This figure is essential to ensure that the solution fits the purpose when it comes to technology-supported education.

I am very happy though to see that many institutions are going well beyond the use of a Learning Management System (LMS; such as BlackBoard or Moodle) to just post assignments or grades. It is important to realize that LMSs are extremely powerful and adaptable to different content. The ability of integrating Sharable Content Object Reference Model (SCORM)-compliant resources to an online course offers great potential when we have the synergy of a subject-matter expert (the professor), an educational expert (the instructional technologist), and powerful software (the LMS).

Is there a big interest for this field? Why so/not? What is/should be the motivation to work on e-Learning and e-Education?

This field is essential for society. As the amount of information about any given field grows every year, we also need a way to transmit the information efficiently and effectively to new generations of scholars and practitioners. Let’s think about a simple example. Most of us will change careers at least two or three times during our lifespans. Some changes may not be too radical, while others may require us to learn a completely new set of fundamental notions onto which we will be required to build. What’s a better way to get ready for these new adventures by learning through resources that stimulate our interest, accommodate to our needs, and keep track of what we know and what we should review?

The flip side of the coin deals with the transparency that comes with popularity. When some disruptive innovation comes along, people cannot do anything but stare at it directly. Imagine how people must have felt when automobiles started becoming popular. I am relatively sure that anyone who saw their first car in the street back then would remember what it looked like. Nowadays there are so many cars that we do not really pay much attention. To many they all look alike, and we just assume that they should exist and work properly. When we visit websites or use mobile applications to learn something new, we just assume that those who created that resource have put much effort into ensuring that the content is accurate and the delivery will be flawless. Educators have a great responsibility, but often the resources available to them are not enough. This may lead to losing the interest of students not because the content is not important, but because the presentation is not what they came to expect.

What is the significance of the eLEOT 2016 event for this field?

eLEOT is a relatively new reality in this field. There are conferences and publication venues that are well-established and function as beacons and benchmarks. Our conference is young, and with that comes great potential. Last year someone asked me what is the main idea that drives eLEOT, what distinguishes us from others. I believe the strength of this conference resides in the people who attend it. We leave as much time as possible to let the participants interact, still ensuring that every presenter has enough time to showcase their work. We have added a Demo session where participants can experience the products of others, and that has been very successful. We want to give space to everyone, and we strive to make everyone feel welcome.

We also value the importance of giving space to new ideas, new approaches, and especially people who are just starting with e-learning. Often conferences are attended by very selected groups of people, often all experts, and the range of topics is relatively narrow. Basically people end up telling each other the same things over and over. I believe that the paradigm shifts significantly when the core of the conference is education, because teachers always try to find new ways to present the material or to engage students. Who knows what kinds of sparks will a presentation about new educational technologies in biology generate in someone who teaches fine arts or literature.

In the end we are just trying to let people talk to each other in a meaningful way. eLEOT is just a mean to many ends, some scholarly, others residing in industry, and most aimed at advancing the field of education giving the same opportunities to established practitioners as well as novices in the field. You never know who may start the next revolution in e-learning.

eLEOT 2016 is now accepting papers! Find out more.

Categories
Call for papers Conferences

eLEOT 2016: submit your paper!

eLEOT 2016, the 3rd EAI International Conference on e-Learning e-Education and Online Training will take place in Dublin, Ireland on August 31 – September 2, 2016.

As the world of technology offers a rapidly increasing number of outlets for creativity and communications, the world of education is undergoing a significant renovation. Each day more classrooms can be accessed from anywhere, at any time. This year’s edition of eLEOT aims at exploring e-learning solutions that spark the attention as well as imagination of students through interactivity, immersion, variety of content, or cutting-edge technologies.

eLEOT 2016 welcomes researches focused on the following topics of interest:

• Accessibility and usability of web-based instruction;
• Assessment;
• Augmented reality solutions;
• Best Practices;
• Big Data in e-learning;
• Blended learning;
• Collaborative learning and social networks;
• High-impact practices in e-learning;
• Informal e-learning solutions;
• Learning analytics;
• Massive Open Online Course;
• Mobile learning;
• Security and privacy in education and e-learning systems;
• Social and organizational perspectives;
• Student engagement;
• Teaching/Educational Models, Frameworks and Platforms;
• Virtual Learning Environments.

Accepted papers will be published in the eLEOT Conference Proceedings and by Springer-Verlag in the Lecture Notes of ICST (LNICST). Proceedings are submitted for inclusion to the leading indexing services: DBLP, Google Scholar, Thomson Scientific ISI Proceedings, EI Elsevier Engineering Index, CrossRef, Scopus, as well as ICST’s own EU Digital Library (EUDL). Authors of the best papers will be invited to submit an extended version of their work through one of the following EAI Endorsed Publications: Transactions on e-Learning, Transactions on Future Intelligent Educational EnvironmentsTransactions on Serious Games.

Important dates:

Paper submission Deadline: 4th April, 2016

Acceptance Notification Deadline: 2nd May, 2016

Camera-ready deadline: 23rd May, 2016

Check the conference official website, to get more info about eLEOT 2016.

Categories
Call for papers Conferences

Submit your paper to eLEOT 2016!

The 3rd EAI International Conference on e-Learning e-Education and Online Training (eLEOT 2016) will take place in Dublin, Ireland on August 31 – September 2, 2016.

As the world of technology offers a rapidly increasing number of outlets for creativity and communications, the world of education is undergoing a significant renovation. Each day more classrooms can be accessed from anywhere, at any time. This year’s edition of eLEOT aims at exploring e-learning solutions that spark the attention as well as imagination of students through interactivity, immersion, variety of content, or cutting-edge technologies.

eLEOT 2016 welcomes researches focused on the following topics of interest:

• Accessibility and usability of web-based instruction;
• Assessment;
• Augmented reality solutions;
• Best Practices;
• Big Data in e-learning;
• Blended learning;
• Collaborative learning and social networks;
• High-impact practices in e-learning;
• Informal e-learning solutions;
• Learning analytics;
• Massive Open Online Course;
• Mobile learning;
• Security and privacy in education and e-learning systems;
• Social and organizational perspectives;
• Student engagement;
• Teaching/Educational Models, Frameworks and Platforms;
• Virtual Learning Environments.

Accepted papers will be published in the eLEOT Conference Proceedings and by Springer-Verlag in the Lecture Notes of ICST (LNICST). Proceedings will be available both in book form and via the SpringerLink digital library, which is one of the largest digital libraries online and covers a variety of scientific disciplines. Proceedings are submitted for inclusion to the leading indexing services: DBLP, Google Scholar, Thomson Scientific ISI Proceedings, EI Elsevier Engineering Index, CrossRef, Scopus, as well as ICST’s own EU Digital Library (EUDL). Authors of the Best Papers will be invited to submit an extended version of their work through one of the following EAI Endorsed Publications: Transactions on e-LearningTransactions on Future Intelligent Educational EnvironmentsTransactions on Serious Games.

Important dates:
Paper submission Deadline: 4th April, 2016
Acceptance Notification Deadline: 2nd May, 2016
Camera-ready deadline: 23rd May, 2016
 
Check the conference official website, to get more info about eLEOT 2016.

Categories
Papers

Learning Management Systems for students’ assessments

Utilizing LMS tools to help with student assessment in an online course’ is the title of the Best Paper awarded at ELEOT 2015, the Second EAI International Conference on e-Learning e-Education and Online Training, held last September at the Università degli Studi eCampus in Novedrate, Italy.

An overview The paper, presented by Dudley B. Turner from the University of Akron, focuses on assessments in education. Generally, the assessment can be formative or summative according to its scope as a progress indicator during the study or at the end of it. Many times the assessment is an examination or a written paper and students have only one attempt to do it. Unfortunately, this method does not allow students to make adjustments or improve their learning progress. The same issue occurs in distance and online learning, where assessments are conducted electronically, typically utilizing a Learning Management System (LMS). Furthermore, a relevant problem concerns the valuable time of assessments, especially when an instructor has a large class or teaches multiple classes.

A new approach The research presented at ELEOT illustrates a different approach than “one-shot” assessments to incorporate additional chances. This involves the use of an LMS and includes rubrics for assessing writing assignments to give students appropriate feedback for later use and improvement. In this case, the LMS is Desire2Learn, but nearly all LMS platforms have similar capabilities. At the basis of the proposal is the same use of motivation as in the games approaches, which encourages students to persist until the success.

Results The study assumes the assessments were good indicators of student learning. In addition, it provides ways that do not increase instructor workload. These results should help other online educators, as they consider possible assessment approaches that are not final but formative or developmental assessments.

Are you interested in reading the full paper? It is available on EUDL.